Arron Banks takes inspiration from Taylor Swift as he sets up ‘Ukip 2.0’

Written by David Singleton on 14 March 2017 in Diary
Diary

The former Ukip donor quoted the pop star to describe his relationship with the party.

Arron Banks has quit Ukip and vowed to build a rival movement after accusing party bosses of suspending his membership.

In recent months, the insurance millionaire has been privately talking to allies including Nigel Farage about starting his own party. 

Today, Banks said that Ukip had suspended his membership because he had claimed the "current leadership couldn’t knock the skin off a rice pudding".

"We will concentrate on our new movement," he added.

Asked by the Guardian if it meant his relationship with Ukip was now over, Banks quoted the pop star Taylor Swift: "We are never ever getting back together … like ever."

 

 

 

 

Banks, who has pumped more than £1m into Ukip coffers, last month demanded to be made chairman of the party so he could stop it "being run like a jumble sale".

He also angered some party insiders with his vow to stand against Ukip's only MP Douglas Carswell at the next general election.

On Twitter, Banks described his new movement as ‘Ukip 2.0, the Force Awakens’. He has previously suggested it could be called the Patriotic Alliance.

Amid confusion about Banks’s membership status, a Ukip spokesman claimed that Banks could not have been suspended because his membership of the party had lapsed in January.

In a statement, Banks said: "The party has somehow managed to lapse my membership despite my having given considerably more than the annual membership this year! On reapplying I was told the membership was suspended pending my appearance at the NEC meeting. 

"Apparently my comments about the party being run like a squash club committee and Mr Carswell have not gone down well. I realise I was being unfair to squash clubs all over the UK, and I apologise to them. We will concentrate on our new movement. Over and out."

 

 

 

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